Reflections week 9 & 10- Astrid Guity

Week 9

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For this weeks, the article that I will be reviewing is “The rise of the seemingly serious but ‘just for entertainment purposes’ medical app by Brian Dolan. This article is a eye opener for peoples who purchases or download free apps without reading the app description. This article discusses that the “Instant Blood Pressure app” claims that they can take user blood pressure by simple using their phone camera. This app was one of the 10 top most pay. This mean a lot of people trust this app and were using it as a reliable medical tool. However, at the end of the app description box they add that the app is just for recreational purpose. Like myself, many individuals most of the time do not read the entire description box of an app. This article also included some apps name from apple stores that are represented as trustworthy medical app but also included in the description box that is “for entertainment purposes only”. The following apps are Walgreen’s RxmindMe, Ezvid’s Do I Have Anxiety?, Amanda Gates’ Medical Calculators, ViTrox Technologies’ What’s My Heart Rate, Philips’ Vital Signs Camera, William T Jones’ Sodium Tracker, GP Imports’ Spirometer Pro and Axiom Therapeutics. This is a problem because many people are sharing their medical record with this apps that claims that there purpose is for entertainment only. This mean those apps are not reliable because an individual health need to be taken serious and not as a game. The following link discusses a lit bit further more about this issues. They also recommended that before downloading any apps you should read the entire description box and ask your physician about the app. This is the link for the article: https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/03/16/health-apps-provide-pictures-if-not-proof-of-health/?_r=0 . After reading both article I wonder if people could sue apple store or google store for allowing fake medical tools apps to be sell or download.  

Week 10

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This weeks article that I especially found interesting was “FTC goes after kids’ brain training game for unsubstantiated health claims by Jonah Comstock. This articles show how many products on the market can claim to be able to offers cognitive improvement with no scientific evidences. The FTC complaint against a company that make a brain training game for children name Jungle Rangers. Jungle Rangers claim that their product can help children to improves their memory, attention, behavior and school performances. These are quality that would attract any parent to buys these product for their children. I personally thinks that parent should research about what types of games there children should be using. This articles remind us that we need to keep in mind that a company could claim anything just to sell their product. However, we are the ones who decided to believe them or not. After reading this article I found out a Ted Talk name “How games make kids smarter” by Gabe Zichermann. This ted talk discusses that has video games evolve society QI increases. Zichermann argue that Kids in facts get better in multitasking and  problem solving. He also point out that kids that play violents games do not become violent because the game. Zichermann says that those kids learned how to be violent somewhere else and the video just help them to become in being violent.

This is the link for the Ted talk video: https://www.ted.com/talks/gabe_zichermann_how_games_make_kids_smarter#t-675944

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